Ingenious Women. Women Artists and their Companions

The Klesch Collection is delighted to share multiple works with the wider public at the exhibition ‘Ingenious Women. Women Artists and their Companions’ curated by Dr Katrin Dyballa and Dr Bodo Brinkmann, the joint endeavour initiated by the Bucerius Kunst Forum Hamburg and the Kunstmuseum Basel.

This exhibition traces the careers of eighteen outstanding women artists from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. With an innovative approach to the subject, it addresses the family context in which these women artists pursued their careers. During this early modern period, women artists were generally denied access to the guilds required to operate on a professional level. Many, if not all, women artists from these centuries came from or married into artistic families and, as a result, would spend their careers in the shadows of their fathers, husbands or brothers. This exhibition explores the rules and exceptions of the family ties in this gendered profession and juxtaposes the women’s work with that of their male relatives and fellow painters to emphasize stylistic likenesses and contrasts.

At the Kunstmuseum Basel, visitors can view our Portrait of Martini Martini and Young Man Smoking a Pipe by Michaelina Wautier, Still Life of Flowers by Rachel Ruysch and Portrait of Count Gentile Sassatelli by Lavinia Fontana. The exhibition is on view until 30 June 2024.

Kunstmuseum Basel | Hauptbau

St. Alban-Graben 16
4051 Basel
Switzerland

Michaelina Wautier, Portrait of Martino Martini, 1654

Michaelina Wautier, Young Man Smoking a Pipe, 1656?

Lavinia Fontana, Portrait of Count Gentile Sassatelli, 1581

Rachel Ruysch, Still Life of Flowers, 1687

Ingenious Women. Women Artists and their Companions

The Klesch Collection is delighted to share multiple works with the wider public at the exhibition ‘Ingenious Women. Women Artists and their Companions’ curated by Dr Katrin Dyballa and Dr Bodo Brinkmann, the joint endeavour initiated by the Bucerius Kunst Forum Hamburg and the Kunstmuseum Basel.

This exhibition traces the careers of eighteen outstanding women artists from the sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries. With an innovative approach to the subject, it addresses the family context in which these women artists pursued their careers. During this early modern period, women artists were generally denied access to the guilds required to operate on a professional level. Many, if not all, women artists from these centuries came from or married into artistic families and, as a result, would spend their careers in the shadows of their fathers, husbands or brothers. This exhibition explores the rules and exceptions of the family ties in this gendered profession and juxtaposes the women’s work with that of their male relatives and fellow painters to emphasize stylistic likenesses and contrasts.

At the Kunstmuseum Basel, visitors can view our Portrait of Martini Martini and Young Man Smoking a Pipe by Michaelina Wautier, Still Life of Flowers by Rachel Ruysch and Portrait of Count Gentile Sassatelli by Lavinia Fontana.

Michaelina Wautier, Portrait of Martino Martini, 1654

Michaelina Wautier, Young Man Smoking a Pipe, 1656?

Lavinia Fontana, Portrait of Count Gentile Sassatelli, 1581

Rachel Ruysch, Still Life of Flowers, 1687

Kunstmuseum Basel | Hauptbau

St. Alban-Graben 16
4051 Basel
Switzerland