Exhibition space for Michelangelo’s Dio Fluviale

Accademia Delle Arti del Disegno

Michelangelo’s works are exhibited in some of the greatest museums around the world. There is one work by the great master that until recently was yet to be shown to the public: the reclining torso of a river god. Intended as a temporary model, the sculpture is not made from marble, but from ephemeral materials such as clay mixed with plant and vegetable fibres, earth, and sand. The work has been in the collection of the Accademia delle Arti del Disegno since the 16th century and due to their excellent care, the fragile piece has managed to survive for over 500 years. During a transformative three-year restoration that was completed in 2017, the dark paint layer that gave it the bronzed effect was removed, and it was successfully returned to its original white colour. In 2020, this rarely-seen sculpture was made accessible to the larger public in a purposely built new gallery, taking its rightful place in the heart of Florence.

The Klesch Collection is proud to have made a contribution to bringing this fantastic sculpture to the public in a space befitting of its history, importance and beauty.

Michelangelo Buonarotti, Dio Fluviale, c. 1525. Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, Florence. © Antonio Quattrone 2017

Exhibition space for Michelangelo’s Dio Fluviale

Accademia Delle Arti del Disegno

Michelangelo’s works are exhibited in some of the greatest museums around the world. There is one work by the great master that until recently was yet to be shown to the public: the reclining torso of a river god. Intended as a temporary model, the sculpture is not made from marble, but from ephemeral materials such as clay mixed with plant and vegetable fibres, earth, and sand. The work has been in the collection of the Accademia delle Arti del Disegno since the 16th century and due to their excellent care, the fragile piece has managed to survive for over 500 years. During a transformative three-year restoration that was completed in 2017, the dark paint layer that gave it the bronzed effect was removed, and it was successfully returned to its original white colour. In 2020, this rarely-seen sculpture was made accessible to the larger public in a purposely built new gallery, taking its rightful place in the heart of Florence.

The Klesch Collection is proud to have made a contribution to bringing this fantastic sculpture to the public in a space befitting of its history, importance and beauty.

Michelangelo Buonarotti, Dio Fluviale, c. 1525. Accademia delle Arti del Disegno, Florence. © Antonio Quattrone 2017